Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Jaffles

This curious flying saucer shaped pie has been familiar to me all my life, but by the name Jaffle, it is entirely new. This is but one of many diverting things I learned in Australia last week. Moreover, they are not filled with ham and cheese, but rather baked beans or spaghetti from a can. The idea is so vile I love it. There are also pies everywhere, meat pies, sold in the 7-11, which are also everywhere. And to make sure it's completely ruined, they dump it into pea soup, for a pie floater. Sounds like something that belongs in the toilet bowl. That's where vegemite belongs too if you ask me.

Tim Tam was also entirely new to me. Vaguely akin to Kit Kat, but better. I was instructed to bite off both ends and sip port through it. Now this really worked. But of everything I tasted, and there really was a lot of fabulous food down under, the anzac biscuit is just gorgeous. Oats, coconut, golden syrup. It's a cookie, but so crisp and lovely. We need them here, trust me.

14 comments:

Juana Isabella/Donna said...

Tim Tams can be found in the US at World Market (formerly Cost Plus) as "Arnott's Originals"
Tim Tams & port is lovely. Hot Cocoa works too, but you have to eat the biscuit quick before it melts.

The Old Foodie said...

Why dont I send you my recipe for Anzac biscuits, Ken?

Gary Allen said...

Please do, Janet!

Anonymous said...

The anzac biscuit history is that they are made without butter or eggs so that they could be sent to the soldiers in WWI. Possibly an urban legend...but a good one! I like to substitute chocolate chips for the dessicated coconut because I actively dislike dessicated coconut...
Barb

Alison said...

I'm glad pies and Anzac biscuits weren't the only things you ate while you were here Ken. So disappointed that you didn't try the apogee of Australian baking - the lamington. Of the meat pie our own 'Dame Edna' (aka Barry Humphries) says 'I think that I could never spy, A poem lovely as a pie. A banquet in a single course, Blushing with rich tomato sauce. A pie whose crust is oven-kissed, Whose gravy scalds the eater's wrist. The pastie and the sausage roll have not thy brown mysterious soul.'

Kaz Augustin said...

You can fill your jaffle with savoury mince, irish stew, or even (I do this) lamb curry! Yum!

And you must've been south because further north, a pie with mushy peas means the flaky pastry lid is lifted and a spoon of mashed (not pureed) peas is slopped on before the lid is pressed back on.

The whole family is watching your Culinary History course from Great Courses at the moment and loving it, but no cooking?! Would have been great to include you whipping up some simple recipes.

Jeremy said...

Yo-yos!

Adam Balic said...

Ken "The Joy of Cooking" has the recipes for "Waffle Sandwiches", which seem to be the same thing as a Jaffle.

theroadtoserendipity said...

You obviously went to NSW as thats the ONLY place in Australia that embraces the pie floater ;). Never heard of it before I met my ex. Timtams and port?! You need to mainline them with the suggested nibbling off both ends with your coffee...sip it through the biscuit BLISS. Vegemite is an aquired taste but so is miso... pies everywhere? Again, must be in NSW, the home of the "bogan" ;). Hope you had a good time down under. Glad you liked our ANZACS but even then the New Zealanders would sulk if you said that they were "ours" they have dibs on them and on pavolovas (but really...we invented them first! ;) )

Ken Albala said...

Janet, YES, please share the recipe!

Ken Albala said...

Kaz, SO glad you're enjoying it. The original idea was to include cooking, and actually in the original version I did for Boston University (twice the length!) there was messy cooking in every segment. I think one clip on Apicius is on You tube. YES: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWtnAlCBHaQ

deana sidney said...

I have never heard of this... bit like the French croques or Italian panini but enclosed. I LOVE it!
Recipes???

Blake Singley said...

The Anzac buiscuit did originate during WW1. The Australian Comforts Fund was one of a number of organisations created to provide aid and relief to soldiers in the frontlines as well as those impacted by the war on the home front. These organisations played an important role in allowing women to feel as if they were taking an active and important role in the war effort and fulfilling their patriotic duties. Members of the Victorian branch of the fund requested biscuits in sealed tins that could be sent to the front.These biscuits needed to be easy and cheap to make and needed to survive the long journey to the front.

Indian rEcipes said...

wow this is beautiful and very much unique