Thursday, June 18, 2015

Yan Pi Noodle Made with Pork Rinds

I have been playing around with adding pork to noodle dough lately, to make something like the Yan Pi wrapper or "swallow skin". Ham dehydrated and ground worked well. This one was equally intriguing: pork rinds finely ground, added to flour, rolled out and cut. This one was made with wheat flour which worked better than tapioca or sweet potato flour. I'm not sure exactly what it should be like, I've never actually tasted them.

Usually they're used as dumpling wrappers, but apparently can be cut into noodles as well. I'll try finely ground cooked pork next.

The piggy flavor went so nicely with shrimp, pork shoulder and cilantro. Fish sauce too. I actually started by sweating shallots in guianciale, which I know makes little sense, but it tasted right. I think if you didn't tell anyone what it was, it would pass as a Pad Thai. I gave my younger son a noodle to taste and he thought it was good, until I told him it was a pig skin noodle!  

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Fresh Bowls for Noodle Soup



http://kenalbalapottery.blogspot.com/2015/06/fresh-bowls.html

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Miniature Noodle Soup

yes this is a real noodle soup in a real pewter paten. I think the smallest that is humanly possible. I needed a magnifier to cut and assemble it all. It's a minestrone by the way!

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Scallops and Rice Noodles

After a week of eating too much, there is something so satisfying about simplicity. But before I explain what this is, you must indulge me in a small boast. At the CIA's World's of Flavor Conference in Napa, they prepared one of my noodle soups for 700 people (Pho Stock and Tapioca noodles with carrots, tomato, lime, sriracha) and Martin Yan was tasting it. I asked what's the verdict? And he said really good chewy homemade noodles. I then told him it was my recipe!

Ok, so these are scallops thinly sliced and marinated in white soy, chardonnay and some potato starch. The soup is a very light dashi stock. The noodles are the thinnest possible rice noodles. Then some seaweed some nice Japanese people gave me at the conference. Really balanced flavors. Anything stronger would have overshadowed the scallops. A keeper recipe.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Adding Meat to Soup: Chinese and Japanese

I have found that there are two completely distinct ways of adding meat to a bowl of noodle soup, both equally enticing. Not that these are the only way you can do it, of course. Meat can be fried and added, braised, long cooked right in the soup. These two methods are for adding it at the last minute.

What you see here is a pork shoulder chop that was seasoned, dipped in egg, then coarse dry bread crumbs, fried in olive oil and butter, then let cool. The crumbs keep all the moisture in the meat, and as you can see I like it a little rare. The next day four thin sliced were made and it was just placed in the very hot soup to heat through. It tastes so much better in the soup than on its own. The technique is more or less Japanese, and the way it's served. The point is that the pork is still really succulent and tender.

But you can also take the exact same cut of meat, slice it thin raw, season with soy sauce, ginger, maybe some sesame oil let it marinate with a generous teaspoon of rice starch, or some other kind of starch. The prep is exactly as you would do for a stir fry. But instead, just lower the slices into the pot of soup and simmer for a couple of minutes. The starch keeps all the moisture inside the meat. It would just seep out into the broth otherwise. This technique is derived (again more or less) from Chinese cuisine.

I'm not sure which I like better, but both are infinitely more interesting than just boiling meat in soup, which if a delicate cut, just ruins it. By the way, the same can be done with chicken breast or very lean beef. Try one of these techniques the next time you do regular chicken soup, for example.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Mung Bean Noodles Tinted

Rather interesting that the same mung beans shown below, when added to a soup base with red cabbage, took on this spooky pink color. Jut think of the possibilities of coloring noodles this way. I wonder if you could get saffron yellow noodles, or red just by cooking in beet juice. I must have read somewhere that people have been trying this, but this one was an accident.

Friday, March 6, 2015

Salad Soup with Mung Bean Threads

I realized this morning that I have eaten nothing but noodle soup for about a week. I can't think of anything that sounds as appealing. This morning, however, I determined to do something else. I can't conscience cereal. I OD-ed on pancakes years ago and can't go near them. Toast, cheese and cold cuts just don't cut it any more. So I thought: salad! There I was tossing romaine lettuce, carrots, celery, red peppers. And I couldn't go through with it. I dumped it all in a pot of dashi stock with mung bean threads. And it was SO good. The vegetables still a little crunchy but definitely cooked. Why don't we cook lettuce more often? This was hot, but I think cold it would be very much like a Korean soup I've had. Must try that soon. I almost drizzled in oil and vinegar!