Monday, October 15, 2012

BOOK GIVEAWAY: Three World Cuisines

Hey Folks, Feeling like a book giveaway. This time it's my new textbook Three World Cuisines: Italian, Mexican, Chinese. It's a bit of food history and anthropology, a bit on cooking technology and utensils, ingredients and plenty of neat recipes. It is essentially an analysis of the ways these three cuisines developed over history and why. Answer this question and I'll send the first person with a complete answer a copy.

What is the traditional way to consume hawthorn in China, apart from its medicinal use. What is this dish called in Chinese and English and why?

15 comments:

gail said...

Known as the crataegus/thornapple/hawberry. Used to make jams, jellies, juices, alcoholic beverages and other drinks, as well as haw flakes. In China, they are called shanzha.
gkuroda(at)gmail(dot)com

Ken Albala said...

Yes, all true Gail, but not the specific really neat dish I'm thinking of.

Lovejoy said...

Hawflakes!

greenmangomama said...

Are you thinking of chao hong guo (stir fried red berries) or nai lao, where it's mixed in yogurt?

CJ - Food Stories said...

Wish I knew the answer ... Would love to have a copy :)

AndrewASell said...

Stab in the dark. Saan Zaa Beng? or Haw Flakes? You said "dish" and I don't think this is a dish...

AndrewASell said...

Can I answer twice? If so, maybe "tanghulu" or translated loosely to "Candied Haw on a Stick" or "bīngtáng húlu 冰糖葫芦". If not, I got nothin but it's been a LOT of fun trying and learning :)

Daphne Medina said...

called Tanhulu (Chinese name). Crispy sugar coated hawthorn berries. Much like a candied apple.

Traditionally Tanhulu was eaten as a counter to heavy/fatty meat/foods that were eaten. Used to lower blood lipids, increase blood circulation and strengthen heart function.

Daphne Medina said...

Chinese name is(bīngtáng húlu 冰糖葫芦).

In addition to above comment!

Rebecca Altman said...

Candy, on a stick though I don't know the names :). Funnily, in China hawthorn's primary use is as a digestive aid- to help with digestion of meats and fats, but in the West its a heart remedy- both physical and emotional. Maybe species related, however in the West we use any species we can get our hands on interchangeably...

Laura@Silkroadgourmet said...

Lots of soups have haw berries in them. One such is:

Haw and Pork Ribs Soup (山楂排骨湯)

Ken Albala said...

Several of you came so close! Bingtang Hulu is exactly what I was thinking of. But literally it means "iced sugar bottle gourd" from the shape of the fruits skewered on a stick. OK, I think a lightning round, between Andrew and Daphne - both of whom got most of the answer right. First person to answer this gets it: where do verdolagas originate and how are they normally used?

Daphne Medina said...

ok...its known as purslane or sometimes as Mexican parsley. Sources refer to its origins as India, however since its considered an exotic weed, it grows worldwide. It was found in N. America (ontario) in pre-Columbian times, but is considered ancient. Its uses are varied. It is a leafy green and used much like spinach. It has mucilaginous qualities and is useful for thickening soups/stews. It is also considered an appetite enhancer so is useful medicinally.

Daphne Medina said...

...also commonly used in Mexican cooking; "huevos con verdolagas" --often stuffed into corn or flour tortillas and eaten for lunch/snack or breakfasts...

Ken Albala said...

Oh my Dear Daphne, Andrew beat you to it, even though he didn't respond here. Let me see if I can get you a comp copy from the publisher. Send me your address via email. Are you still in Spain?